Women in tech? Not still enough!

Gender equality on work places has seen a strong improvement in recent years and, also if a lot of efforts need to be done, the trend seems to be well clear: the role of working women is gaining more and more importance while wages differences are getting closer.

But.. there’s a but. Is every sector experiencing such a beneficial trend? Unfortunately not.

Infographic: The Tech World Is Still a Man's World | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

Surprisingly one of the worst area for gender equality is tech. While it has an average performance for Leadership jobs, being 25% S&P500 average for women with leading positions, shows a lack of women in charge for technical jobs.

None of the top companies has more than 25% of tech positions covered by women with Microsoft reaching a mediocre 18%, such a results are even more disappointing as the United Nations planned last year to have a 50-50 gender parity on work places within 2030.

I hope new tech startuppers will revert such a trend to avoid loosing good resources and opportunities on the way.

 

What’s the world like from startups perspective?

The Silicon Valley Bank has recently released the Startup Outlook Report 2017, a survey meant to know deeper the situation of startups and the mood of their funders.

The report had 941 respondent companies mainly working in US, China and UK  on sectors like tech and health.

The picture coming out from the survey points out probably for the first time a pessimistic outlook for business, 16% of companies in fact thing that the business conditions will be worse for the future. Just one year ago pessimists were a mere 1%.

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Funding is still an issue for almost every startup, only 19% in fact find raising capitals for their business not challenging while the remaining 81% is somewhat rather then extremely challenged during fundraising process.

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Regarding Brexit, it seems that UK startups are not scared of remaining as only 17% are considering to move their headquarters outside UK or Europe following the triggering of article 50 of which only 1% will leave Britain for sure.

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It’s still to define instead how Brexit will affect talent recruiting that is considered, by 76% of responders, as the main public policy issue affecting their companies. It’s very likely though, in my opinion, that at least for EU nationals will be put in place bilateral agreements for permanent working visa in the UK.

All images are courtesy of Silicon Valley Bank.